'Avolatte': Hipster cafés serve lattes in avocados

There are many delicious foods in this world: pizza and ice cream, houmous and cake, avocados and coffee.

But that is not to say these things should be paired together.

And yet, that is what people are doing. Behold, the ‘avolatte’:

As the name would suggest, it is a latte served in an avocado skin. And it’s happening.

Combing two of Melbourne’s obsessions – lattes and avo 😂

A post shared by Truman Cafe (@trumancafealbertpark) on May 11, 2017 at 2:02pm PDT

Just why anyone would want to drink a latte from an avocado over a regular cup is unclear – would the coffee be infused with avocado? How would you hold it without a handle? Is it to save on washing up?

 

So many questions, so few answers.

One man recently posted a picture online of his avolatte from a cafe in Turkey, and there’s also a coffee shop in Australia (of course) serving the beverages, if they can be deemed as such.

What with avocados and latte art both amongst millennials’ favourite Instagram subjects, it’s possible the avolatte could be the next big trend fuelled by the picture-sharing social network.

Despite this, not everyone is a fan of the avolatte:

What’s next? Cocktails served in banana skins? Smoothies in egg shells?

It is quite the time to be alive.

منبع مطلب : http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/avolatte-avocado-caffe-latte-coffee-cafe-australia-hipster-a7746561.html

Two killed in smash after car seen driving wrong way up M62 motorway at 2.30am

Two people have been killed in a horrific crash after a car was seen driving the wrong way up the M62 motorway in the small hours of the morning.

Two men aged 34 and 37 were found dead in the wreckage of a white Skoda Octavia at the scene near Bradford at 2:30 this morning. 

A 22-year-old man was arrested on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving. 

The motorway remains closed westbound between junction 26 and 27. 

More follows…

 

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منبع مطلب : http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/m62-motorway-crash-head-on-police-arrest-road-closure-congestion-a8284621.html

London’s murder rate exceeds New York’s for first time in recent history

April 1 (UPI) — The murder rate in London over the past two months has exceeded New York City’s for the first time in modern history, according to reports.

Eight people were murdered in London between March 14 and March 20, bring the total for the month up to 22, reported the Sunday Times. New York City had 21.

In February, London had 15 reported murders, compared to 11 in New York City.

Overall totals so far this year still has New York as the deadlier city with 50 murders, compared to 46 in London. According to the Sunday Times, London’s murder rate hasn’t exceeded New York’s since 1800.

But the increased murder numbers in London during February and March has set London on pace for a 13-year high.

According to the Guardian, of the 46 murders in London, 31 were stabbings, four were shootings, three were from multiple injuries, one was by neck compression and seven are waiting to be determined.

London’s Metropolitan Police spokesperson told the BBC it is “concerned at the increase in murders in London”.

“One murder is one too many, and we are working hard with our partners to understand the increase and what we can all do to prevent these tragedies from happening in the first place,” the spokesperson said.

منبع مطلب : https://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2018/04/02/Londons-murder-rate-exceeds-New-Yorks-for-first-time-in-recent-history/1221522635375/

Famous birthdays for April 2: Michael Fassbender, Emmylou Harris

April 2 (UPI) — Those born on this date are under the sign of Aries.

They include:

— Charlemagne, founder of the Holy Roman Empire, in 742

— Italian adventurer Giacomo Casanova in 1725

— Danish storyteller Hans Christian Andersen in 1805

— French novelist Emile Zola in 1840

— Surrealist artist Max Ernst in 1891

— Baseball Hall of Fame member Luke Appling in 1907

— Actor Buddy Ebsen in 1908

— Actor Alec Guinness in 1914

— Australian auto racer Jack Brabham in 1926

— Singer/songwriter Marvin Gaye in 1939

— Radio personality Dr. Demento, born Barret Hansen, in 1941 (age 77)

— Singer/songwriter Leon Russell in 1942

— Actor Linda Hunt in 1945 (age 73)

— Literary and cultural critic Camille Paglia in 1947 (age 71)

— Country singer Emmylou Harris in 1947 (age 71)

— Actor Pamela Reed in 1949 (age 69)

— Actor Christopher Meloni in 1961 (age 57)

— Actor Clark Gregg in 1962 (age 56)

— Actor Adam Rodriguez in 1975 (age 43)

— Actor Michael Fassbender in 1977 (age 41)

— Rapper Quavo Marshall in 1991 (age 27)

منبع مطلب : https://www.upi.com/Entertainment_News/2018/04/02/Famous-birthdays-for-April-2-Michael-Fassbender-Emmylou-Harris/5541522551873/

UPI Almanac for Monday, April 2, 2018

Today is Monday, April 2, the 92nd day of 2018 with 273 to follow.

The moon is waning. Morning stars are Jupiter, Mars, Mercury, Neptune and Saturn. Evening stars are Jupiter, Uranus and Venus.


Those born on this date are under the sign of Aries. They include Charlemagne, founder of the Holy Roman Empire, in 742; Italian adventurer Giacomo Casanova in 1725; Danish storyteller Hans Christian Andersen in 1805; French novelist Emile Zola in 1840; surrealist artist Max Ernst in 1891; baseball Hall of Fame member Luke Appling in 1907; actor Buddy Ebsen in 1908; actor Alec Guinness in 1914; Australian auto racer Jack Brabham in 1926; singer/songwriter Marvin Gaye in 1939; radio personality Dr. Demento, born Barret Hansen, in 1941 (age 77); singer/songwriter Leon Russell in 1942; actor Linda Hunt in 1945 (age 73); literary and cultural critic Camille Paglia in 1947 (age 71); country singer Emmylou Harris in 1947 (age 71); actor Pamela Reed in 1949 (age 69); actor Christopher Meloni in 1961 (age 57); actor Clark Gregg in 1962 (age 56); actor Adam Rodriguez in 1975 (age 43); actor Michael Fassbender in 1977 (age 41); rapper Quavo Marshall in 1991 (age 27).


On this date in history:

In 1513, Ponce De Leon of Spain landed at what is now St. Augustine, Fla., to search for the Fountain of Youth.

In 1792, Congress passed legislation authorizing the U.S. Mint to coin money, all to be inscribed with the Latin words “E Pluribus Unum,” a motto meaning “Out of Many, One.”

In 1877, President Rutherford B. Hayes and his wife, Lucy Hayes, brought the annual Easter Egg Roll to the White House. Prior to that, it had been held on the grounds of the U.S. Capitol.

In 1917, President Woodrow Wilson asked Congress for a declaration of war against Germany.

In 1932, aviator Charles Lindbergh left $50,000 in a New York City cemetery for the return of his kidnapped son. The child was later found dead. Bruno Hauptmann subsequently was convicted of kidnapping and murder, and was executed.

In 1982, Argentine troops stormed the Falkland Islands in South America, overwhelming the small British marine unit stationed there.

In 1992, a New York jury convicted mob boss John Gotti in five killings, racketeering and other charges. Gotti died in prison in 2002.

In 2005, Pope John Paul II, head of the Roman Catholic Church for more than a quarter century, died at his Vatican apartment. The 84-year-old pontiff had urinary and bacterial infections that led to organ failure.

In 2007 the University of Florida repeated as NCAA Division I basketball champion, becoming the first school to win both the national collegiate major basketball and football titles the same calendar year.

In 2012, One Goh, a 38-year-old former nursing student in Oakland, Calif., opened fire on the Oikos University campus, killing seven people and injuring three others, authorities said. He was captured a short time later.

In 2014, a soldier shot and killed three service members, injured 16 others, then killed himself at Fort Hood, Texas, 4 1/2 years after 13 people died in a shooting spree at the same base.

In 2015, al-Shabab militants conducted an “operation against the infidels,” killing 148 people at Garissa University College in Kenya.

In 2017, a custodian and four others clubbed and stabbed to death 20 people at a Sufi shrine in Sargodha in Pakistan’s Punjab province.


A thought for the day: President John F. Kennedy said, “The goal of education is the advancement of knowledge and the dissemination of truth.”

منبع مطلب : https://www.upi.com/Top_News/2018/04/02/UPI-Almanac-for-Monday-April-2-2018/3121522551734/

On This Day: Charles Lindbergh leaves $50K in cemetery for return of son

April 2 (UPI) — On this date in history:

In 1513, Ponce De Leon of Spain landed at what is now St. Augustine, Fla., to search for the Fountain of Youth.

In 1792, Congress passed legislation authorizing the U.S. Mint to coin money, all to be inscribed with the Latin words “E Pluribus Unum,” a motto meaning “Out of Many, One.”

In 1877, President Rutherford B. Hayes and his wife, Lucy Hayes, brought the annual Easter Egg Roll to the White House. Prior to that, it had been held on the grounds of the U.S. Capitol.

In 1917, President Woodrow Wilson asked Congress for a declaration of war against Germany.

In 1932, aviator Charles Lindbergh left $50,000 in a New York City cemetery for the return of his kidnapped son. The child was later found dead. Bruno Hauptmann subsequently was convicted of kidnapping and murder, and was executed.

In 1982, Argentine troops stormed the Falkland Islands in South America, overwhelming the small British marine unit stationed there.

In 1992, a New York jury convicted mob boss John Gotti in five killings, racketeering and other charges. Gotti died in prison in 2002.

In 2005, Pope John Paul II, head of the Roman Catholic Church for more than a quarter century, died at his Vatican apartment. The 84-year-old pontiff had urinary and bacterial infections that led to organ failure.

In 2007 the University of Florida repeated as NCAA Division I basketball champion, becoming the first school to win both the national collegiate major basketball and football titles the same calendar year.

In 2012, One Goh, a 38-year-old former nursing student in Oakland, Calif., opened fire on the Oikos University campus, killing seven people and injuring three others, authorities said. He was captured a short time later.

In 2014, a soldier shot and killed three service members, injured 16 others, then killed himself at Fort Hood, Texas, 4 1/2 years after 13 people died in a shooting spree at the same base.

In 2015, al-Shabab militants conducted an “operation against the infidels,” killing 148 people at Garissa University College in Kenya.

In 2017, a custodian and four others clubbed and stabbed to death 20 people at a Sufi shrine in Sargodha in Pakistan’s Punjab province.

منبع مطلب : https://www.upi.com/Top_News/2018/04/02/On-This-Day-Charles-Lindbergh-leaves-50K-in-cemetery-for-return-of-son/6871522549921/

After Uber's fatal self-driving taxi crash, city planners suggest a radical new solution

When a woman was hit and killed by a self-driving Uber taxi in Arizona recently, it was both an awful shock and a horrifying inevitability.

The crash was the combination of a series of tragic and small problems. If the car had been going slightly more slowly, if either its human or computer driver had spotted the woman slightly earlier, or if the road was slightly differently designed, then it’s possible no accident would have happened.

But there was also a grim lack of surprise in the crash. The cars were always destined to be involved in fatal accidents – even if they are projected to happen much less than they do in cars driven by humans – and that will continue, with this first death all but guaranteed to be followed by many more.

Limiting those fatal crashes will be the responsibility of the companies, policymakers, designers, engineers and other experts. But it could also be the responsibility of a group little talked about in the debate over autonomous vehicles: town planners, and the politicians who decide how we build the places we live.

There was always going to be a first crash. But this one seemed in so many ways to exemplify the challenges those concerned by the social impact of autonomous vehicles now face: the woman hit by the car was pushing along her bike, a form of transport mostly neglected by many modern city planners, and some have suggested she was forced to cross in the middle of the road by a road scheme that is almost actively hostile to pedestrians.

That the car was part of a self-driving vehicle trial by Uber, a company known for providing cabs, might appear strange. But the race to make self-driving cars is being entered by just about everyone with any connection to automobiles: traditional car companies, technology firms such as Google and taxi companies like Uber. (That the latter two industries have always had something of an allergic reaction to regulation might be chilling to the people who have to share roads with their vehicles.)

Those technology companies have done something like this before. Autonomous vehicles are often compared to the internet: both potentially transformative, both potentially disastrous. And getting them right could require avoiding some of the mistakes that were made when the web was introduced.

“What we’re seeing is that the focus has been largely on the engineering side – on developing vehicles,” says urban planner Mark Wilson. “What we found with other technologies like the internet, and will probably find with autonomous vehicles, is that the social context lags way behind.”

Those social questions are not about engineering. They’re about how we share and live in our cities: how space should be taken by cars and road, and how those cars should be controlled. It’s not too grand to say this might require entirely rethinking what we expect from a city.

“On the dream side, we’d see a road with vehicle-sharing, more efficient vehicles, perhaps a denser city and more efficient use of urban land area,” says Wilson. “Then there’s also the planner’s nightmare: people own autonomous vehicles and won’t share, they drive more miles, people will live in the countryside and sip coffee and work on their laptop while the vehicle travels even further, because now the time and frustration has been reduced.

“We all bring our own hopes and dreams. For planners, we are optimistic but it still may not come about.

“The internet started as a very optimistic technology, but what we’ve seen is that it’s bogged down in great complexities related to how it’s used.”

If we’re not careful, self-driving cars might simply make it easier to get around; they’ll trigger no deep rethinking of our cities, apart perhaps from letting people travel further and longer and thereby entrenching many of the problems that currently flow from unequal and inefficient transport systems. “When they invented low-fat foods, people ended up eating more of them,” says Jarrett Walker,  a public transit consultant who regularly speaks about the future of transport.

“The problem, the challenge of induced demand in particular is enormous.”

Now is precisely the time those questions need to be asked: someone has died on our streets, and did so in service of a technology that remains mostly hypothetical to most people. “Not many people have shared a road with an autonomous vehicle, or at least known about it,” says Wilson. “We don’t have a lot of insight into how people will feel – whether it’ll be upsetting, off-putting or reassuring. We just don’t know yet.”

But if most people believe autonomous vehicles to be a long way off, many of the people who should be thinking about it appear to think those questions have already been answered.

“Very frequently, when I’m talking about any issue about how to build a city or to build a better transport system in the pre-automation condition, many people have been trained to tune out and not care, because soon we’ll have autonomous cars and they’ll change everything,” says Walker.

“There are two problems. First, the cars won’t change everything: there are still basic geometric problems. And secondly they undermine support for a space efficient, large-scale public transport system.”

On his website, Walker describes how he came to do the work he does: seeing the transformation of Portland, Oregon, as the city changed direction and adopted public transit. “Experiencing this transformation as a teenager – commuting by bus across the city through a downtown that grew more vibrant by the day – taught me to believe in the possibility of rapid and fundamental change in how a city imagines and builds itself,” he writes. It’s easy to imagine teenagers in a few years will be living through the exact same kinds of revolution, for better or worse.

Whether we integrate autonomous vehicles into a public transit network, or an even more extreme version of the current, privatised network of road vehicles, is another question that governments must yet still have mostly not reckoned with. Uber’s work on self-driving vehicles is largely selfish – it hopes eventually to do away with the drivers that it has to pay, and who have largely served to be a frustration because they ask for proper rights and protections.

But Uber’s car will at the very least be shared; if it is successful, it might do away with some of the paradigm of each person owning a car, which is unsustainable as cities continue to grow and become more dense. “The only way that we can make an autonomous vehicle work is if they are fleets – if you experience them as taxis rather than cars in your driveway,” says Walker.

This is only halfway towards the utopia that some thinkers lay out, in which those autonomous vehicles will operate more like buses.

“We have to compare the autonomous car with autonomous public transport,” says Walker. “There simply will be no way for public transport to compete with their sudden abundance and the reduction in the hassle of driving.

“On the other hand, the sudden increase will cause so many problems that it will be an emergency.

“I assume that when we have abundant and scalable driverless vehicles, we will also have driverless buses. And because public transport operating costs are mostly labour, it can be massively easier and cheaper to run.

“That’s the only way the autonomous future works.”

The world has addressed something like these problems before. Cities had run for thousands of years before the car turned up, but even the most ancient places were able to adapt to the new vehicles. It’s easy to forget, however, just how much work that took and how much time was spent; there’s much less labour and time available this time around.

“The first automobile required constant innovation,” says Wilson. “Someone had to invent the stop sign, or the traffic light.

“We also had an an incredible willingness in many places to embrace the new technology and change our way of life in order to accommodate it – neighbourhoods were bulldozed, motorways were built.”

There appears to be very little appetite for restructuring our cities today. Even the places that have welcomed autonomous vehicle firms into their cities – Arizona, where the Uber crash happened, has welcomed the trials with open arms, which self-driving carmakers like in part because there is no complicated weather to get in the way of sensors – haven’t made any great moves towards fixing transportation. The Uber crash happened on a road that was built for cars, and a world controlled by them, and autonomous vehicles are mostly being placed on those same roads with few adjustments.

“In an ideal world we would overlay our planning interests with transportation. Transportation has always been a force in designing cities,” says Wilson, pointing to the fact that cities were once designed only for walking, then for public transport, and now for cars – though in ways that still need to map onto those old walking paths.

“Many cities, especially in the UK, are hundreds of years old or even thousands of years old and they’re not designed for traffic. There are problems with retrofitting cities into modern footprints.”

We may finally have a chance to reverse some of that trend. We might not need quite so much road space, for instance – so what if that became cycle space, or footpaths? “Each one of these decisions is going to be subject to national and local forces that are trying to influence the outcome, and one of the challenges in all of this is who has the responsibility for educating the public, meeting the public and explaining to voters what the future holds,” says Wilson.

“While the engineering and automotive world has been looking at this for quite a while, it’s fairly new in terms of politics, and planners and the social context.”

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منبع مطلب : http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/features/uber-selfdriving-car-autonomous-vehicle-crash-death-arizona-latest-explained-a8281566.html

Liverpool manager Jurgen Klopp faces defensive dilemma before 'fire' of Manchester City Champions League tie

Liverpool had already been warned before they gave away the penalty at Selhurst Park on Saturday. They were warned three minutes earlier, when Wilfried Zaha zoomed in behind and nearly scored; they were warned three weeks earlier too, when Marcus Rashford sliced along the same diagonal at Old Trafford. So when Zaha made an untracked run and drew the penalty, chasing after a simple Christian Benteke header, it had been coming.

Afterwards Jurgen Klopp was reluctant to criticise his defenders, dismissing the obvious comparison with Rashford’s goal. “Yes, the goal and the penalty and the situation before we can defend better, even when it’s very difficult,” Klopp said. “Benteke or Lukaku in these situations are really good, and yes we have spoken about positioning, but it was a different position here [compared to] Manchester United.”

Palace’s penalty didn’t matter in the end – strikes by Sadio Mane and Mohamed Salah turned the match around – but these are potentially defining days, with the first edition of a juicy Champions League quarter-final against Manchester City on Wednesday, before the Merseyside derby and the second leg all within a week. It is a bad time for Zaha to expose the fallibility in Liverpool’s right side.

The young right-back Trent Alexander-Arnold struggled, though really he was a victim of what makes Klopp’s teams so compelling to watch, a full-back stationed so high up the pitch that his defensive duties always begin with a scramble back home like a man who’s left the gas on. Then there was Joel Matip; twice in the first half he sent passes aimlessly off the pitch before flailing his arms accusingly at no one in particular. One or both could lose their place against City.

Klopp’s defensive dilemma is heightened by the fact that in Leroy Sane Liverpool face one of the most dangerous wingers in Europe, a player of undetectable movement, prowling off grid, barely registering a blip before beginning each stealth assault.

Pep Guardiola loves to stretch his opposition and that is when Liverpool are most susceptible, as the individual components of Klopp’s supercharged machine become exposed. Klopp must decide whether to stick with the 19-year-old Alexander-Arnold, throw in the unsharp Nethaniel Clyne or perhaps turn to the ever-reliable James Milner, and he must choose whether to partner Joel Matip or Dejan Lovren with Virgil van Dijk. These decisions are crucial; it is a team game, but against Guardiola the game tends to be won and lost in isolated duels.

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“We should finish the game with 11 first of all, that would be cool,” said Klopp of his plans for City. “We know it’s difficult. Did we think before the first [league game against City in September] we would lose 5-0? No. Did we think before the second [in January] we would win 4-3? No. Do we know we have a chance? Yes. But they are the favourites.

“At specific moments I think we are on a similar level but they have been much more consistent and that’s why they are about 20 points higher in the league. I have no problem with respecting that. But we all know that in this game, it doesn’t mean too much. We see our chance but we know it will be unbelievably difficult.”

Just like those two league encounters, Wednesday’s meeting at Anfield promises plenty of goals, and how Klopp sets up his team will go some way to deciding who scores them. It promises to be a special spectacle, above all, because these two managers only know one way to play. “If I would have had the choice to watch a Champions League game on Wednesday, I would watch this one,” added Klopp. “It is about tactics, but there will be fire in the game. So that’s cool.”

Follow the Independent Sport on Instagram here, for all of the best images, videos and stories from around the sporting world.


منبع مطلب : http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/european/liverpool-jurgen-klopp-manchester-city-pep-guardiola-champions-league-a8284481.html

Who will Anthony Joshua fight next? Why Deontay Wilder unification showdown may have to wait

Things move quickly in heavyweight boxing, by far the most lucrative and dramatic division in the sport.

In the early hours of Sunday morning, down some anonymous corridor deep in the bowels of the shellshocked Principality Stadium, Eddie Hearn could not hide his frustration at being asked about Deontay Wilder for the thousandth time. Joseph Parker was yesterday’s news. And people were already demanding Anthony Joshua’s next snarling opponent on a platter.

“Oh mate, this is so boring,” he said with a weary puff of the cheeks, while the cramped room that held the bleary-eyed post-fight press conferences began to empty. “What more can we do? All I see is them on social media claiming that this is a fight they have wanted for years, but they haven’t approached us once. Not once. There have been zero offers.

“And there is a very limited amount of time left for that fight to happen. It has to be 2018. So if there is a deal to be done — that is the right deal — then we will do it next, no problem. If not then maybe we have one in the summer and do it in December. But I don’t know.”

It didn’t take long for the party line to be revised. Later that day, as a rubble-strewn Cardiff continued to nurse its collective hangover, Hearn’s old man made an appearance on BBC Radio Five Live with a decidedly more optimistic outlook. “I think negotiations will start next week,” Barry said cheerily. “It is a fight Anthony really wants and I think he wants it this year.”

Both father and son have made it clear that time is running out for Wilder to accept this fight — and that isn’t simply a marketing ploy cooked up at Matchroom headquarters back in Brentwood. There is a good reason why so few boxers have gone on to unify the four major world titles: namely because the obstacles that must be overcome outside of the ring are as difficult as the ones in it.

Already there are a glut of mandatory challengers that complicate the picture. The WBC has previously insisted it “will fully support such a tremendous bout” between their champion Wilder and Joshua, but Dillian Whyte is likely to be instated as their mandatory soon enough.

Meanwhile another belt means another mandatory opponent for Joshua: Alexander Povetkin defeated David Price in emphatic fashion on Saturday night to retain both his WBA and WBO titles. And to complicate things further the IBF recently ordered Kubrat Pulev and Dominic Breazeale to meet in a final eliminator. Joshua is hardly short of opponents.

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All of these fights delay the one showdown everybody wants to see: Joshua vs Wilder with all four of the major world titles on the line. After all, as Hearn noted shortly after Joshua’s unanimous points win: “At some point somebody is going to have to drop a belt, and the whole point of the Wilder fight is to win the final belt. So we don’t want to drop a belt and then fight Wilder, that’s not the history fight it could be.”

“So it has to happen in 2018 as otherwise we’re going to have some major problems with the politics and the mandatory challengers.”

There are other options, just in case you weren’t already confused enough. After defeating Parker, Joshua could not resist not-so-subtly reminding Wilder exactly who possess the upper hand in negotiations between the pair. “They can come to Cardiff, or Wembley. We will stay here,” he laughed in unison with 80,000, as Wilder watched on from home. “All the time people used to have to go out to America to watch it, they don’t need to anymore.”

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But both Joshua and Hearn carefully rowed back on this outburst in the hours after the fight. “I’d love to go to America and actually look at the landscape, to work out serious they are,” Joshua said. “The US has potential,” Hearn added. “If AJ wants to be a truly global sportstar he needs to go to America,” Barry later clarified on radio, for good measure.

If Joshua was to head to American next, looking to smoke Wilder out ahead of one final unification showdown in December, he may end up fighting somebody else entirely: a 29-year-old rising star of the division, who has never before been beaten and calls himself the ‘Big Baby’.

Jarrell Miller last fought in November 2017, when he knocked out the grizzled old Pole Mariusz Wach, in his first fight since signing a co-promotional deal with Matchroom. “I’m going to fight Wach, then some other guy and then I get AJ, if he still has the belt,” he boldly asserted upon putting pen to paper.

A bout between the two therefore makes sense — even if it is not the fight the fans are clamouring for.

Deontay Wilder:

The controversial American, unbeaten in a 40-fight career, is the opponent most boxing fans want to see next for Joshua. Promoter Eddie Hearn has not ruled out the prospect of it happening this year, although he has admitted to a degree of frustration regarding the approach of Wilder’s management. If it does take place, then a win for Joshua would see him take Wilder’s WBC belt and make him undisputed heavyweight king.

Jarrell Miller:

Unbeaten American Miller has made it clear he wants to face Joshua, and there are few who could doubt that he deserves a world title chance. Hearn is understood to be keen on a Joshua versus Miller encounter, and the Brooklyn-born heavyweight could well be Joshua’s next opponent, especially if the Briton takes a fight this summer.

Alexander Povetkin:

Povetkin, a 38-year-old Russian, showed his considerable punching power by inflicting a fifth-round knockout on Liverpool’s David Price in an undercard fight on Saturday’s bill at the Principality Stadium. He is the mandatory WBO challenger and would undoubtedly be viewed as a dangerous opponent, but any fight would potentially lack the pulling power of a Wilder showdown.

Tyson Fury:

Joshua has made public his desire to fight former world champion and fellow Briton Fury, and while the contest could easily happen, it is likely to be some way down the line given that Fury has not fought since 2015 and is still working his way back to fitness. It would, though, be a contest that captures the imagination.

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منبع مطلب : http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/general/boxing/anthony-joshua-next-fight-opponent-vs-deontay-wilder-joseph-parker-tyson-fury-what-belts-a8284436.html

How to wear the all white menswear trend

Are you the kind of guy that likes to dress on the dark side? Well now is the time to lighten up, because a menswear whiteout is imminent. 

Spring/summer is the perfect time to add something a little brighter to your wardrobe, but for 2018 things are being turned up a notch thanks to tonal dressing – by which we mean wearing the same hue, or variations of it, from head to toe.

From soft vanilla to brilliant and sharp white, designers have been attracted to the light this season, with the likes of Xander Zhou showcasing tonal looks inspired by Nineties officewear.

Here, formalwear like tailored trousers and shirts in stark shades were worn together, and broken up with flashes of yellow or red.

Elsewhere, Billionaire sent a series of all-white ensembles down its runway – the standout of which consisted of form-fitting bottoms paired with a white roll-neck and utility jacket. 

But while wearing head-to-toe white might not look out of place on a sun-kissed model strutting down the catwalk, how does a gent plagued by the realities of British weather pull it off?

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The key here is to stick to some basic rules. Firstly, you can differentiate your look by wearing different variations of white in one ensemble – think cream, ivory, eggshell and light beige – as well as mixing in super-light greys and sharp cuts of black or colour for contrast. 

Similarly, you can create clear separation through texture by combining fabrics like cotton with leather to keep your look visually rich. 

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Most importantly though is to wear it with conviction. Committing to one colour is by no means an easy feat, but master it and your look will smack of sartorial confidence. 

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منبع مطلب : http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/fashion/how-to-wear-all-white-tonal-menswear-trend-spring-summer-2018-a8278711.html