Iran plane crashes into mountain, killing all 66 people on board, state TV says

A plane crash in southern Iran has killed all 66 people on board, according to state TV.

The flight was reportedly carrying 60 passengers, including one child, and six crew members when it crashed into the side of a mountain near the remote town of Semirom 620km (about 390 miles) south of the capital, Tehran. 

The ATR-72, a twin-engine turboprop used for short-distance regional flying, was on its way to the city of Yasuj in the country’s south.

The carrier, Aseman Airlines, is a semi-private firm headquartered in Tehran that specialises in flights to remote airfields across the country. It also flies internationally. 

Under decades of international sanctions, Iran’s commercial passenger aircraft fleet has aged, with air accidents occurring regularly in recent years. 

The Iranian Red Crescent said it has deployed to the area. Authorities said they would be investigating. 

Following the 2015 landmark nuclear deal with world powers, Iran signed deals with both Airbus and Boeing to buy scores of passenger planes.

منبع مطلب : http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/iran-plane-crash-passenger-commercial-semirom-a8216131.html

Tony Collins' Rochdale success serves as a sad reminder of football's whitewashed history

For Rochdale’s chairman, Chris Dunphy, the media round has been constant as kick-off with Tottenham nears. He has been asked again and again about the re-laid pitch at Spotland that will cost an estimated £500,000 and wipe out most of the profits that Keith Hill’s team have made in their run to the fifth round of the FA Cup.

However, whatever Dunphy says will not have the resonance of the statement Freddie Ratcliffe, one of his predecessors as Rochdale chairman, made to the press in September 1960. “We are aware that some eyebrows will be raised because of his colour but that made no difference and we sincerely hope it will make no difference in his career as a manager.”

They had appointed Tony Collins to be Rochdale’s player manager. Nearly 60 years on it makes for a cringe-inducing read but, for the time, it was astonishingly enlightened.

Sunday will be Rochdale’s biggest game since Collins led them to the 1962 League Cup final, where they lost to Norwich City, and the first time Rochdale have made the fifth round since they faced Crystal Palace in February 1990.

It was a match recalled for the heroics of Keith Welch in the Rochdale goal, for John Solako striking the post and for Peter Ward squandering the chance to force a replay in the final moments at Selhurst Park. When that match was played Collins was still the only black manager to have been employed in the English game and he would retain this curious distinction until Keith Alexander took over at Lincoln three years later.

Collins had been born in North Kensington, not far from where the burnt-out frame of Grenfell Tower now stands. His mother, Lou Collins, was single and a teenager. His father, whose name Lou never divulged, was African.

He was brought up by his grandparents in Notting Hill, which in 1958, the year after Tony left Crystal Palace for Rochdale, would be convulsed by the race riots that formed the climax for Colin McInnes’s novel about teenage London, Absolute Beginners.

Four years later, Collins would take Rochdale, who were to finish 12th in the Fourth Division, to the League Cup final. He remains the only black British manager to have led his team out in a major cup final.

 

It was to prove a career cul-de-sac. Managerially, it produced just memories, especially the two-legged semi-final against Blackburn who had won the FA Cup two years before. The local press referred to Collins, who was fascinated by tactics, as “the professor of soccer know-how” and he had surprised Blackburn in the first leg at Spotland.

However, within eight minutes of the second leg at Ewood Park kicking off, Rochdale’s lead had been reduced to 3-2. Collins redeployed his centre-forward Louis Bimpson as a defender and rode out the attacks to earn a £20 bonus.

There was another reason why Collins benefited so little from his achievement. When the League Cup was launched in 1960 it had so offended the FA that the Football League’s president, Joe Richards, was told the final would not be staged at Wembley in his lifetime. Not until 1967, when Tottenham played Chelsea, did the FA give way.

When Rochdale faced Norwich in the final, it was over two legs with no television coverage. It did not resonate much beyond Lancashire and Norfolk. Peter Whyke, who was part of Collins’s team, recalled that though people still talk about the final, “only one or two newspapers sent reporters to cover it”.

When Tottenham played Burnley in the FA Cup final a month later, it became the first to be covered by the BBC in the way we would recognise today, with multiple cameras placed around Wembley with close-ups, pictures in the tunnel and a full match build-up on Grandstand.

After Collins left Rochdale in 1967, Ratcliffe was met by a delegation of players demanding his reinstatement. Collins, though, was confident of finding more work and applied for 13 managerial vacancies. He was not interviewed for any of them.

Collins thought that a coincidence. His daughter, Sarita, who wrote his biography, Football’s Master Spy, did not. Her father had kept the letters he had sent to clubs such as Watford, Peterborough, Rotherham and Chester but there appeared to have been no replies.

When asked if he was proud of the fact he was the first black manager of a league side, he said: “Not particularly. I always thought of football as being a game where you’re in one minute and out the next. I never stopped to think about it.”

Collins retreated to the back rooms, where he excelled as chief scout for Don Revie at Leeds, where he compiled the famous dossiers that were handed to the players the night before every game.

Ron Atkinson, who employed him in a similar role at Manchester United, remarked: “When he showed me the dossiers, they were so detailed that you wondered how anyone could have got through them in one evening but they were the forerunners of today’s video analysis.

“Tony had a remarkable eye for detail and for spotting a footballer and deserves to be much better known than he is.” Had Bristol City, whom he also worked for, followed his advice, Kevin Keegan would have gone to Ashton Gate rather than Anfield in 1971.

ruud-gullit.jpg

His most famous scouting mission for Atkinson came when he was asked to go to Eindhoven and give his opinion on Ruud Gullit. When he returned to Manchester he handed over a compelling report on PSV’s centre-half.

Atkinson, who had wanted Gullit in midfield at Old Trafford, thought Collins had scouted the wrong man, not realising his versatility. There was not to be a second attempt to bring Gullit to Manchester. Atkinson was replaced by Alex Ferguson with whom Collins did not get on. “I found him very hard to talk to,” Collins recalled. “He was very abrupt.”

It would take another decade for Gullit to come to England, where he would become the second black manager to take his team to a major English final. That was 21 years ago. There have been no others.

منبع مطلب : http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/fa-league-cups/tony-collins-rochdale-league-fa-cup-whitewashed-history-tottenham-spotland-a8214446.html

Artistry on the floor



There was a time when designers and decorators considered floor coverings to be background elements in a room. Rugs and tile were meant to be practical, not attention-getting.

That’s changed. Now, the floor is often one of the strongest elements in a space. Today’s wide range of artistic floor designs are often inspired by art and nature.


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Artistry on the floor 03

This undated photo provided by Drake/Anderson shows a library designed by Drake/Anderson in New York. Designer Jamie Drake says ‘This cozy library with dramatic navy walls is energized in a distinct and artful way by the dynamic carpet underneath – it also perfectly pulls together the room’s details.’


Marco Ricca, Drake, Anderson via Associated Press

“Painterly rugs with evocative strokes and striking color combinations are often the perfect foundation for many of our room designs,” says Jamie Drake, who runs the Drake/Anderson design firm in Manhattan with his colleague, Caleb Anderson. “These rugs help bring a room to life and, with their movement and color, accentuate the other design elements in the space.

“There’s something galvanizing” about having art underfoot, he says. “It envelops an interior in a way that wall-mounted artwork cannot.”

Stark Carpet has a Brueghel-esque floral rug called Botanique; the rich, deep hues of an Old Master’s palette are brought to life in softly loomed wool. Their Sapphire collection includes Ether, inspired by American artist Helen Frankenthaler’s Abstract Expressionist stain painting. And there’s Peppy, inspired by Willem de Kooning’s 1955 work “Police Gazette,” with various hand knots reflecting movement and drama via textural elements.

Flowers are the theme of artist Bari J. Ackerman’s collection for Grandin Road. Her exuberant contemporary paintings lead to stylish contemporary rugs, hand-hooked by artisans.

New York’s Doris Leslie Blau Gallery stocks a Dali-esque collection of wool rugs inspired by the freewheeling expressiveness of children’s artwork. Each rug is a composition of colorful swoops and swaths.


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Artistry on the floor 01

This undated photo provided by Turkish rug maker STEPEVI shows one of their rugs. The company artfully combines traditional rug making with new technology. This Blossom pattern is inspired by spring buds; the grey and gold colorway suggests dawn breaking through the dark of night. 


STEPEVI via Associated Press

Turkish rug maker Stepevi pixellates bird-wing imagery, which is then loomed into a textural rug in a palette of seven hues. On another rug, blossoms are rendered in gold against a graphite background, suggesting dawn breaking. An embossing technique is applied during the tufting process to create a rich, tactile pile that highlights the pattern.

Glass and ceramic tiles are another good medium for floor art, with their smooth textures and a range of size possibilities from tiny mosaics to large slabs.


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This undated photo provided by Ornamenta shows their Manifesto collection of porcelain tiles screen printed with abstract images initially rendered free-hand on canvas. The appeal of many trending flooring materials is when the artist’s technique is obvious, like in this collection by Ornamenta. 


Ornamenta via Associated Press

“Tile is super-durable, so regardless of design, floors will look beautiful and withstand wear and tear for many years,” says Alena Capra, a designer in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. “Thin tile products can be installed over existing floor tiles, making it easier than ever to give floors a stylish makeover.”

Says Italian architect Paola Marella: “Technological progress has expanded the range of finishes available for ceramic tiles. For example, digital printing … has extended the confines of images beyond the individual piece. But screen-printed and hand-printed tiles retain their appeal.”

That appeal is especially apparent when the artist’s technique is obvious, as in Ornamenta’s Manifesto collection of porcelain tiles screen-printed with abstract images that were initially rendered free-hand on canvas.


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This undated photo provided by New Ravenna shows their Black Pool, a hand-cut mosaic, and is based on a painting by Gail Miller. This design is part of the Broad Street collection for New Ravenna. Manhattan-based artist Gail Miller’s moody, mysterious ‘Black Pool’ painting of deep eddying water and a storm-tossed sky is rendered here in tiny hand cut mosaics, available at www.newravenna.com


New Ravenna via Associated Press

New Ravenna features a Chinoiserie bird-on-branch pattern made of marcasite, mica, pewter and quartz glass. The design was by artist Sara Baldwin of Exmoor, Virginia. Also here is Manhattan artist Gail Miller’s moody “Black Pool” painting of deep eddying water and a storm-tossed sky, rendered in tiny, hand-cut mosaics.

Settecento’s Animalier collection features python, cheetah and leopard-skin prints on large porcelain tiles. And Italian company Sicis offers intriguing mosaic collections patterned like realistic feathers or lizard skin.

If you like the look of tile but you rent or can’t otherwise use the real deal, consider Home Smith’s Beija Flor vinyl mats. They come printed with a range of patterns like encaustic, mosaic and geometrics; it’s flooring that looks like a master craftsman or artist spent hours working on it.


منبع مطلب : http://tdn.com/lifestyles/artistry-on-the-floor/article_c0de8fe5-b787-5f0a-b605-8956bbf48035.html

‘Jewish perpetrators’ of Holocaust remark by Polish PM sparks outrage in Israel

“The Polish Prime Minister’s remarks here in Munich are outrageous,” Benjamin Netanyahu said in a statement on Saturday, referring to the remarks Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki made at the 2018 Munich Security Conference. Netanyahu said that there was “an inability to understand history and a lack of sensitivity to the tragedy of our people,” adding that he intends to speak to Morawiecki immediately.

The story unfolded on Saturday, when Morawiecki was asked by an Israeli journalist about the new Polish law that criminalizes blaming Poles for complicity in crimes of the Holocaust during WWII. The reporter, Ronen Bergman, told of his mother whose family narrowly escaped arrest by the Nazis after learning their Polish neighbors planned to turn them in.

“After the war, my mother swore that she will never speak Polish for the rest of her life, not even a single word,” the reporter said. “If I understand correctly, after this law is legislated, I am considered criminal in your country for saying this. What is the purpose, what is the message that you want to convey to the world?” he asked, garnering a round of applause.

Morawiecki responded: “It’s not going to punishable, not going to be seen as criminal, to say that there were Polish perpetrators, as there were Jewish perpetrators, as there were Russian perpetrators, as there were Ukrainian and German perpetrators.”

The Polish prime minister then defended the legislation that outlaws using the phrase ‘Polish death camp’ or otherwise implying that Poles were complicit in Nazi crimes during WWII. “Well, ladies and gentlemen, there were no Polish death camps, or Polnische Vernichtungslager, there were German Nazi death camps.”

Poland “was the only place on Earth” where thousands of Polish families were exterminated by the Nazis and the entire villages were annihilated “for helping our Jewish brothers and sisters,” Morawiecki said.

His remarks have predictably been blasted in Israel, with many journalists and politicians accusing him of antisemitism and siding with Holocaust deniers.

منبع مطلب : https://www.rt.com/news/419130-jewish-perpetrators-poland-holocaust/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=RSS

Iranian passenger plane with 66 people crashes midflight – local media

The Iran Aseman Airlines flight disappeared from radar in a mountainous area. The search and rescue operation is hampered by bad weather, preventing helicopters from landing, Iran’s Press TV reports.

The missing plane is an ATR 72, a French-Italian short-haul regional airliner, which was introduced in the late 1980s. Iran signed a contract to buy 20 ATR 72s in 2016 with an option for 20 more, and received the first batch last year. The fleet of Iran Aseman Airlines, however, is older, with aircraft delivered between 1993 and 2009, according to a planespotters.net database.

Semirom is located about 80km north of Yasuj, the capital of the southwestern Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad Province.

منبع مطلب : https://www.rt.com/news/419129-iranian-plane-passengers-crashes/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=RSS

Facebook advertising VP says ‘Russian meddling’ didn’t aim to sway the election

Thirteen Russian nationals and three entities have been indicted by a US federal grand jury for supposed meddling in the presidential election. The allegations include “supporting the presidential campaign of then-candidate Donald J. Trump… and disparaging Hillary Clinton,” including through Facebook. Now the Facebook vice president for advertising, Rob Goldman, says the accusers and their massive mainstream media supporters got it wrong.

Most of the coverage of Russian meddling involves their attempt to effect the outcome of the 2016 US election. I have seen all of the Russian ads and I can say very definitively that swaying the election was *NOT* the main goal,” Goldman tweeted.

He then reiterated a fact that has been out there for a while: “The majority of the Russian ad spend happened AFTER the election. We shared that fact, but very few outlets have covered it because it doesn’t align with the main media narrative of Tump [sic] and the election.” What he didn’t mention was that the advertising allegedly bought by Russians linked to the Internet Research Agency, which Western mainstream media calls a Kremlin-linked “troll farm,” cost around $100,000 – a trifling amount compared to the tens of millions spent by the actual Trump and Clinton campaigns.

READ MORE: Until there are facts on election meddling, it’s all just blather – Lavrov on Mueller indictment

Faithful to the rest of the ‘Russian meddling’ narrative, Goldman went on to accuse Russia of a “propaganda and misinformation effort” that aims “to divide America by using our institutions, like free speech and social media, against us.” And, according to him, “It is working incredibly well.”

The Russians, Goldman believes, are the reason Americans are “quite divided as a nation.”

Commenters rushed to prove Goldman right in that last bit, at least. Furiously bashing him for contradicting even one part of the FBI allegations, they accused him of covering up his own failure to prevent the “meddling” from his position, enabling an “attack on America by a foreign power” and “bowing down to Trump.

منبع مطلب : https://www.rt.com/usa/419128-facebook-vp-russian-meddling/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=RSS

On This Day: Astronomer discovers Pluto

Feb. 18 (UPI) — On this date in history:

In 1841, the first filibuster in the U.S. Senate began. It ended March 11.

In 1865, after a long Civil War siege, Union naval forces captured Charleston, S.C.

In 1884, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain was published.

In 1930, dwarf planet Pluto was discovered by astronomer Clyde Tombaugh.

In 1954, the Church of Scientology was established in Los Angeles.

In 1967, J. Robert Oppenheimer, the “father of the atomic bomb,” died in Princeton, N.J., at the age of 62.

In 1979, snow fell in the Sahara Desert in southern Algeria for the first known time.

In 2001, Dale Earnhardt Sr., stock-car racing’s top driver, was killed in a crash in the final turn of the final lap of the Daytona 500. He was 49.

In 2003, nearly 200 people died and scores were injured in a South Korea subway fire set by a man authorities said apparently was upset at his doctors.

In 2004, 40 chemical and fuel-laden runaway rail cars derailed near Nishapur in northeastern Iran, producing an explosion that killed at least 300 people and injured hundreds of others.

In 2006, 16 people died in rioting in Nigeria over published cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad that enraged Muslims around the world.

In 2008, two of four masterpieces stolen from the Zurich museum a week earlier, a Monet and a van Gogh, were found in perfect condition in the back seat of an unlocked car in Zurich.

In 2013, Jerry Buss, who owned the Los Angeles Lakers for more than 30 years, during which they won 10 NBA championships, died after a long fight against cancer. He was 80.

In 2013, eight men disguised as police disabled a security fence, drove two vehicles onto a Brussels airport tarmac and stole diamonds worth $50 million.

In 2014, violence erupted between protesters and security forces in the Ukrainian capital of Kiev, eventually resulting in 98 dead with an estimated 15,000 injured and 100 believed missing.

منبع مطلب : https://www.upi.com/Top_News/2018/02/18/On-This-Day-Astronomer-discovers-Pluto/8201518404073/

UPI Almanac for Sunday, Feb. 18, 2018

Today is Sunday, Feb. 18, the 49th day of 2018 with 316 to follow.

The moon is waxing. Morning stars are Jupiter, Mars and Saturn. Evening stars are Neptune, Uranus and Venus.


Those born on this date are under the sign of Aquarius. They include Britain’s Queen Mary I in 1516; Austrian physicist Ernst Mach in 1838; stained glass artist Louis Comfort Tiffany in 1848; Italian automaker Enzo Ferrari in 1898; actor Jack Palance in 1919; actor George Kennedy in 1925; author and magazine editor Helen Gurley Brown in 1922; author Len Deighton in 1929 (age 89); author Toni Morrison in 1931 (age 87); cartoonist Johnny Hart in 1931; filmmaker Milos Forman in 1932 (age 86); artist Yoko Ono, wife of John Lennon, in 1933 (age 85); author Jean M. Auel in 1936 (age 82); actor Cybill Shepherd in 1950 (age 68); actor John Travolta in 1954 (age 64); film director John Hughes in 1950; game show icon Vanna White in 1957 (age 61); actor Greta Scacchi in 1960 (age 58); actor Matt Dillon in 1964 (age 54); rapper and record producer Dr. Dre, born Andre Romelle Young, in 1965 (age 53); producer/TV personality Tracey Edmonds in 1967 (age 51); actor Molly Ringwald in 1968 (age 50); TV personality/personal trainer Jillian Michaels in 1974 (age 44); singer-songwriter Regina Spektor in 1980 (age 38); actor Jeremy White in 1991 (age 27).


On this date in history:

In 1841, the first filibuster in the U.S. Senate began. It ended March 11.

In 1865, after a long Civil War siege, Union naval forces captured Charleston, S.C.

In 1884, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain was published.

In 1930, dwarf planet Pluto was discovered by astronomer Clyde Tombaugh.

In 1954, the Church of Scientology was established in Los Angeles.

In 1967, J. Robert Oppenheimer, the “father of the atomic bomb,” died in Princeton, N.J., at the age of 62.

In 1979, snow fell in the Sahara Desert in southern Algeria for the first known time.

In 2001, Dale Earnhardt Sr., stock-car racing’s top driver, was killed in a crash in the final turn of the final lap of the Daytona 500. He was 49.

In 2003, nearly 200 people died and scores were injured in a South Korea subway fire set by a man authorities said apparently was upset at his doctors.

In 2004, 40 chemical and fuel-laden runaway rail cars derailed near Nishapur in northeastern Iran, producing an explosion that killed at least 300 people and injured hundreds of others.

In 2006, 16 people died in rioting in Nigeria over published cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad that enraged Muslims around the world.

In 2008, two of four masterpieces stolen from the Zurich museum a week earlier, a Monet and a van Gogh, were found in perfect condition in the back seat of an unlocked car in Zurich.

In 2013, Jerry Buss, who owned the Los Angeles Lakers for more than 30 years, during which they won 10 NBA championships, died after a long fight against cancer. He was 80.

In 2013, eight men disguised as police disabled a security fence, drove two vehicles onto a Brussels airport tarmac and stole diamonds worth $50 million.

In 2014, violence erupted between protesters and security forces in the Ukrainian capital of Kiev, eventually resulting in 98 dead with an estimated 15,000 injured and 100 believed missing.


A thought for the day: “A right is not what someone gives you; it’s what no one can take from you.” — Ramsey Clark

منبع مطلب : https://www.upi.com/Top_News/2018/02/18/UPI-Almanac-for-Sunday-Feb-18-2018/5691518397005/